Get the tools you need to LEAD not just MANAGE your family.

Increase cooperation, encourage responsibility, teach life skills, and prepare your child to launch successfully into life as an adult!

  • 1

    Master List of 'Must Know' Skills

    • Master List Must Know Adult Skills (PDF)

    • Every Single Qualification for Success is Acquired Through HABIT

    • The Common Denominator of Success

    • Getting & Staying Motivated as a Parent

    • 4 Week -- 28-Day Challenge Tracker

  • 2

    Family Daily & Weekly Routines

    • Example: FAMILY RULES/MISSION STATEMENT (REACH UPWARD)

    • Example: DAILY SCHEDULE & HDDT (FAMILY EXPECTATIONS & STANDARDS)

    • EDITABLE Template: Daily Schedule & Family Expectations; Family Rules/Mission Statement

    • Example: MORNING ROUTINE

    • Example: EVENING ROUTINE

    • Example: STUDY TIME ROUTINE

    • EDITABLE Templates: Morning Routine; Evening Routine; Study Time Routine & Daily Schedule

    • Example: AM & PM Routines CHECKLIST

    • Example: DAILY FAMILY ROUTINE

    • EDITABLE Template: Daily Family Routine; Daily Schedule; AM & PM Routine Checklist

    • Example: ROUTINE CHECKLIST (FOR MOM)

    • EDITABLE Template: Routine Checklist (for Mom)

    • Example: WEEKLY HOMESCHOOL INDIVIDUAL CHART (Multiple Ages)

    • EDITABLE Template: Weekly Chart (Homeschool/Chores)

  • 3

    Family Agreements & Contracts

    • INTERNET ACCESS CHECKLIST

    • FRIEND TIME REQUIREMENTS CHECKLIST

    • DEVICE CHECKOUT FORM

    • CELL PHONE PURCHASE/USAGE CONTRACT

  • 4

    Chores & Job Charts

    • Example: WEEKLY CHORE CHECKLIST

    • EDITABLE Template: Weekly Chore Checklist

    • Example: CHEF & MEAL PLANNER CHECKLIST

    • EDITABLE Template: Chef & Meal Planner Checklist

    • Example: MEAL SCHEDULE (MENU) & ASSIGNMENTS

    • EDITABLE Template: Meal Schedule (Menu) & Assignments

    • Example: PROFESSIONAL HOUSE ORGANIZER CHECKLIST

    • EDITABLE Template: Professional House Organizer Checklist

    • Example: HOUSE CLEANER CHECKLIST

    • EDITABLE Template: House Cleaner Checklist

    • Example: SANITATION SPECIALIST & ASSISTANT CHECKLIST

    • Example: SANITATION CHECKLIST (2020)

    • EDITABLE Template: Sanitation Specialist (Two Versions)

    • Example: FAMILY KITCHEN JOBS CHECKLIST

    • EDITABLE Template: Family Kitchen Jobs Checklist

    • Example: NANNY & BABYSITTING CHECKLIST

    • Example: NANNY CHECKLIST

    • Example: BABYSITTING HOURS LOG

    • EDITABLE Template: Nanny & Babysitting Checklists & Babysitting Hours Log

    • Example: BATHROOM CLEANER CHECKLIST

    • Example: BATHROOM & MAIN FLOOR CHECKLIST

    • EDITABLE Templates: Bathroom Cleaner Checklists (Two Versions)

    • PROFESSIONAL BATHROOM CLEANER BADGE

    • Example: LAUNDRY SPECIALIST CHECKLIST

    • Example: LAUNDRY CHECKLIST (2020)

    • EDITABLE Template: Laundry Specialist Checklists (Three Versions)

  • 5

    Homeschooling & Study Time

    • Example: Kindergarten/1st/2nd/3rd Grade Study Chart

    • EDITABLE Template: Kindergarten & Early Grade Chart

  • 6

    FAQs

    • Influence & Diplomacy

  • 7

    Additional Resources

    • To help on your journey...

"There's something powerful about putting it all on paper...

"I printed out a new phone contract for our 12 year old daughter. We already had an "understanding" and limitations on her phone, but there is something powerful about having it all on paper and signing it. Now those understandings are clearer and in writing!"

FAQ

  • Friend time requirements... do you have a checklist that kids have to fill in? I know with 3 kids and homeschooling, I struggle to keep track of what everyone is doing and if they are staying on task. You have more than double that! How do you do it?

    Anytime I'm starting a new system or the expectations are 'unclear', I create a checklist. And it's often best to have a checklist for each person. Just the simple act of checking something off provides accountability -- checking it off means they've read it and done it... so you BOTH know that it's been done. It IS easier for them to keep track of what they have done and still need to do than for you to try and keep track of everyone. Once the pattern/habits have been well established then it might be okay to have a list you reference on the wall, knowing that if you ask "Did you do all of those things on the list already?" that there will likely be some fudge room... it won't be 100% and sometimes that's okay too.

  • Do you set alarms for kids? How do you ensure they are waking up on time?

    Question cont. "Before I started to homeschool. it was a struggle waking my kids up for school. Then I read some studies that kids were not getting enough sleep- and I decided to let them sleep until they naturally woke up. However, some days it seems one or two of my kids will sleep until almost 9am... when we are supposed to be starting devotional. That doesn't give them time to do all the needed things in a morning routine before devotional. I'm afraid by waking them up, they won't be getting the rest their brain needs for the day, especially my son who struggles with attention issues."

    Answer: We do not set alarms for our children. I don't have an alarm for myself. Greg does have an alarm and so do my older teens. We help them get an alarm when they ask for one and WANT to start getting up on their own. Otherwise, I allow my younger kids (9 and under) to sleep as long as they want and to wake up naturally. Good sleep is so important for their development. If they seem to be sleeping in 'too long', then I consider adjusting their bedtime. If they are chronically not up in time for devotional, then change the bedtime, or change the devotional time. I tried to have devo at 8 am for awhile, but switched it to 8:30 am because it fit better with the family flow in the morning -- even then it doesn't always happen at that time. It may be earlier or later depending on when we went to bed, etc. The point is that we do it whenever we're all awake and eating breakfast. The goal is not to make things harder but to figure out where things fit in as naturally, and to be consistent -- which does NOT mean doing it at the same time every day, but just DOING it every day.

  • I would definitely love to learn more about how you approach chores... especially curious about the weekly chores and "jobs" that are paid.

    I will be developing explanations for the chore system and how we pay for jobs. It will be added into this course when complete.

  • I noticed that in order to gain access to the internet, even for school, your kids have to complete certain things. What if they DON'T?

    Question cont. Internet access. I noticed that in order to gain access to the internet, even for school, your kids have to complete certain things. What if they DON'T? What do they do for study time? The reason I ask this is because we rely heavily on the internet for our learning, and if my children have even a little bit of free time, they start to lose focus and start playing with each other. And how do you grant access to certain kids and not others?

    Answer:This system is optional depending on how much leverage you feel you need to get certain things done. I implemented it when I felt that my kids were spending too much time on the internet but had NOT done their studies sufficiently. What happens if they DON'T do what they need to do to earn access for study time? Well, they don't get to do study time (learning is a privilege). But really, that depends on how strongly you feel about them doing the 'morning stuff'. For me, learning how to be neat and tidy and pick up after yourself is just as important as doing math and learning science. We're interested in holistic development. So if they don't do the morning stuff they don't get to use the internet to study... but if they don't study they don't get to use the internet at all that day. It's their choice. If they decide to 'play' all day, that's their choice. But that also means they have not earned their privileges (like internet access). My kids usually will only spend a few hours, or maybe a day, before they decide they're going to do their routines. I use the xFi app that goes with my Comcast Xfinity service and it allows me to turn on/turn off internet for individual devices. If you don't have that option, then I would just physically remove devices from children, change passwords, etc. Whatever you need to do to ensure they can't get on the device without first fulfilling the necessary requirements.